archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
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archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info
archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.
Click here for additional photos and process information.
[via io9]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

Jim Rodda, better known as hobbyist 3D printer Zheng3, recently completed work on these awesomely elaborate Barbie-compatible 3D-printed suits of medieval armor. The project was crowdfunded through Rodda’s Faire Play Kickstarter project. The suit of golden parade armor is made of over 40 difference pieces, including a winged helmet, feathered tassets and a detailed coat of arms.

Click here for additional photos and process information.

[via io9]

hammpix:

As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we’re used to, and because we’re tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it’s useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you’ll save yourself great difficulty later.
Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You’ll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.
Zoom Info
hammpix:

As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we’re used to, and because we’re tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it’s useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you’ll save yourself great difficulty later.
Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You’ll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.
Zoom Info
hammpix:

As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we’re used to, and because we’re tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it’s useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you’ll save yourself great difficulty later.
Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You’ll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.
Zoom Info

hammpix:

As an artist, you’ll have to draw turned heads countless times. But when the head is turned, drawing the far eye poses a special challenge. This is because we must foreshorten that eye more than we’re used to, and because we’re tempted to shape it like the near eye, which is less foreshortened. Therefore, it’s useful to practice drawing the far eye by itself, without the near eye to throw you off. Print these sheets, draw the eyes, and you’ll save yourself great difficulty later.

Note that all of these eyes are facing our left. You’ll need to practice right-facing eyes as well, so flop the sheets in Photoshop, print them again, and draw those also.